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Graffiti

Publication Date: July 1, 2008

Our culture is driven by a concept of beauty that negatively impacts adolescent girls. The Scriptures are full of assurances regarding our identity in Christ, inherent worth to the Creator, and the secrets to tapping into the source of true and lasting beauty, yet girls and young women continue to struggle with their focus on outer beauty. In Graffiti: Learning to See the Art in Ourselves, Erin Davis applies the language of God’s Word on identity, beauty, and worth to the life of a contemporary young woman. In fact, women who have never adequately dealt with this issue will find themselves reviewing their youth, and redirecting their spiritual eyes.

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Graffiti


Original publisher: Washington, D.C. : U.S. Dept. of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, [2006] OCLC Number: (OCoLC)70110621 Subject: Graffiti — United States — Prevention. Excerpt: … The Problem of Graffiti 1 The Problem of Graffiti This guide addresses effective responses to the problem of § Although graffiti is also found graffiti – the wide range of markings, etchings and paintings within public or private property § that deface public or private property. In recent decades, ( such as in schools ), this guide primarily addresses graffiti in places graffiti has become an extensive problem, spreading from the open to public view. largest cities to other locales. Despite the common association of graffiti with gangs, graffiti is widely found in jurisdictions of all sizes, and graffiti offenders are by no means limited to gangs. Because of its rising prevalence in many areas – and the high costs typically associated with cleanup and prevention – graffiti is often viewed as a persistent, if not an intractable, problem. Few graffiti offenders are apprehended, and some change their methods and locations in response to possible apprehension and cleanups. As with most forms of vandalism, graffiti is not routinely reported to police. Many people think that graffiti is not a police or ” real crime ” problem, or that the police can do little about it. Because graffiti is not routinely reported to police or other agencies, its true scope is unknown. But graffiti has become a major concern, and the mass media, including movies and websites glamorizing or promoting graffiti as an acceptable form of urban street art, have contributed to its spread. Although graffiti is a common problem, its intensity varies substantially from place to place. While a single incident of graffiti does not seem serious, graffiti has a serious cumulative effect; its initial appearance in a location appears to attract more graffiti. Local graffiti patterns appear to eme…